Welcome to Norfolk Falconry all about East Anglia

East Anglia is found on the Eastern side of Great Britain. Sometimes it is difficult to distinguish whether it is on the southern or the eastern side of the country. Generally people have assumed that East Anglia is on the eastern side of England.

Norfolk Has A Lot Of Attractions For Birdwatchers

Norfolk Has A Lot Of Attractions For Birdwatchers

Birdwatching has a long tradition in England. But this exciting hobby of many bird lovers has long since left the island and is very popular in numerous areas around the world. There are many interesting birds to watch in Norfolk, which has been the case several times recently. So far, birdwatchers could look forward to rare bird species, which you can see in Norfolk and Waveney. These included, for example, the Rufous Bush Chat or the White Blackbird. The rare birds congregate on the shores of the county.

The Rufous Bush Chat is just a tiny bird, but it caused a lot of commotion. That happened when he showed up at the Stiffkey Marshes in October of the previous year. Immediately more than 100 birdwatchers rushed near Wells. That even led the local police to step in. After all, it was necessary to point out to the enthusiastic crowd the currently applicable restrictions when gathering large groups of people and to ensure order. Experts believe it was the first time somebody saw this robin species in the UK since the 1990s. Others, however, went back even further in history. They believe the last sighting was in the 1960s. The excitement was correspondingly great.

Extinct But Alive

Our next splendid specimen has been extinct for 240 years. However, in November of last year, the White-Tailed Sea Eagle was spotted swooping over the Norfolk coast several times. He has also been sighted over Lakenheath, Eley and in Cambridgeshire. The White-Tailed Sea Eagle appears when it flies over Europe from migration. A family discovered the exotic-looking hoopoe in August last year. They drove through the village of Wighton, which is between Fakenham and Wells. The bird does not breed in the UK and is therefore rarely seen. Even so, his sightings in the county have increased lately.

The White Blackbird is no less unusual. Bird lovers owe his sighting to a coincidence. A mother went for a walk with her children in February of this year. When she was out with her five children, she saw the bird sitting on a drainpipe by St. Edmunds Church in Fishergate, Norwich. The White Blackbird has partial albinism. This state gives it its unusual colour. The birds pass this on from generation to generation, but it can also arise from other circumstances. The bird is unique and rare, but not too much.

Extinct But Alive
Extinct But Alive

The black-browed albatross is one of the more common species, but it is considered endangered. The joy was all the greater when a birdwatcher spotted the bird in Lowestoft in September last year. The albatross flew over the sea two miles from the coast. This bird is one of the giant flying birds. It breeds not only in Chile and South Georgia but also in the Falkland Islands and the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Such sightings are among the highlights in a birdwatcher’s life. Reason enough to go looking again in Norfolk.